Posted in Coronavirus Op/Ed Racism The Conversation

As Arizona coronavirus cases surge from early reopening, Indigenous nations suffer not only more COVID-19 but also wrongly from blame

At the Navajo Nation town of Fort Defiance, Arizona, staff pack food boxes. The Navajo Nation now has the highest per capita COVID-19 infection rate in the U.S.   (Getty Images/Mark Ralston) by  Lisa Hardy, Northern Arizona…

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Posted in Black Lives Matter Essay The Conversation

From grandfather to grandson, the lessons of the Tulsa race massacre

“More than 1,000 businesses and homes were burned to the ground, scores of black families were herded into cattle pens at the fairgrounds, and one of the largest and most prosperous black communities in the United…

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Posted in Abuse of power Analysis The Conversation

Militias evaluate beliefs, action as President threatens soldiers in the streets

Constitutionalists say they fear – a forceful expansion of government power against its people. But most militia groups have been silent. To date, only a few have made any sort of public statement. Members of militia…

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Posted in Analysis Coronavirus Justice

Coronavirus deaths and those of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery have something in common: Racism

In Minneapolis, the memorial near the spot where George Floyd died while in police custody. Getty Images / Kerem Yucel by April Thames, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences The…

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Posted in Analysis Coronavirus News The Conversation

Blocking the deadly cytokine storm is a vital weapon for treating COVID-19

Immune cells release proteins called cytokines which alert the rest of the immune system that a virus is present. www.scientificanimations.com, CC BY-SA by Alexander (Sasha) Poltorak, Tufts University The killer is not the virus but the…

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Posted in Nature News The Conversation Wildlife

COVID-19 is eroding scientific field work – and our knowledge of how the world is changing

Collecting data on invasive plants, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, California. Connar L’Ecuyer/NPS   by  Richard B. Primack, Boston University and Casey Setash, Colorado State University Editor’s note: Summer is prime time across much of…

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Posted in Analysis Coronavirus The Conversation

Coronavirus, ‘Plandemic’ and the seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

by  John Cook, George Mason University; Sander van der Linden, University of Cambridge; Stephan Lewandowsky, University of Bristol, and Ullrich Ecker, University of Western Australia The conspiracy theory video “Plandemic” recently went viral. Despite being taken…

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Posted in Coronavirus Health Care Hospitals News The Conversation

Fearing coronavirus, patients are delaying hospital visits, putting health and lives at risk. ‘I thought I could wait this out’

The ultimate cost for delaying treatment can be loss of life. Data from the CDC shows the U.S. had 66,000 more deaths than expected from January through the end of April, with only about half of…

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Posted in Community Nature The Conversation

You’re not going far from home – and neither are the animals you spy out your window

Is it that same busy squirrel you’re watching every day? Julian Avery, CC BY-ND Julian Avery, Pennsylvania State University Watching the wildlife outside your window can boost your mental well-being, and it’s something lots of people…

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Posted in Analysis Congressional Oversight Courts

Historic power struggle between Trump and Congress to be reviewed by Supreme Court

  by Stanley M. Brand, Pennsylvania State University Saturday, May 9, 2020 On May 12, the Supreme Court will hear argument in two cases concerning congressional demands, known as subpoenas, for materials that President Donald Trump…

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Posted in Coronavirus News The Conversation

Majority of vaccine skeptics plan to refuse a COVID-19 vaccine

by Kristin Lunz Trujillo, University of Minnesota and Matt Motta, Oklahoma State University Monday, May 4, 2020 The availability of a vaccine for the novel coronavirus will likely play a key role in determining when Americans…

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Posted in Analysis Op/Ed The Conversation

The ‘first scientist’s’ 800-year-old tonic for what ails us: the truth

English scientist Roger Bacon believed everyone has a responsibility to think for themselves. Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de santé, CC BY by Richard Gunderman, Indiana University It seems that science has been taking a beating lately. From decades…

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Posted in Analysis Business Coronavirus Law The Conversation Worker Safety

Why offering businesses immunity from coronavirus liability is a bad idea

  by Timothy D. Lytton, Georgia State University Governors around the country are attempting to restart the economy by easing restrictions put in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The prospect of returning to “normal”…

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Posted in Climate change Environment News The Conversation Waste Water

Climate change threatens drinking water quality across the Great Lakes

Harmful algal bloom in Lake Erie, Sept. 4, 2009. NOAA/Flickr by  Gabriel Filippelli, IUPUI and Joseph D. Ortiz, Kent State University This story is part of the Pulitzer Center’s nationwide Connected Coastlines reporting initiative. For more…

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Posted in Journalism News Politics The Conversation

‘Reopen’ protest movement created, boosted by fake grassroots tactics

by  Marc Ambinder, University of Southern California, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism Many Americans have been under strict stay-at-home orders, or at least advisories, for more than a month. People are frustrated and depressed, but…

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Posted in Bailout 2020 Evictions Housing Opinion The Conversation

Renters still left out in the cold despite temporary coronavirus protection

  by  Kirk McClure, University of Kansas and Alex Schwartz, The New School Emergency relief for renters across America may protect them from the threat of eviction during the coronavirus crisis – but it won’t last…

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Posted in Coronavirus Medicine The Conversation

Blood sugar levels may influence vulnerability to coronavirus, and controlling them through conventional means might be protective

by Adam M. Brufsky, University of Pittsburgh April 22, 2020 Can watching your blood sugar help fight COVID-19? Sugar is not only something that sweetens our food. It is also something that is an essential part…

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Posted in Analysis Coronavirus Public Health The Conversation

Hand-washing and distancing don’t have tangible benefits – so keeping up these protective behaviors for months will be tricky

Another reason to reconsider rush to open the gates. by Gretchen Chapman, Carnegie Mellon University and George Loewenstein, Carnegie Mellon University In recent weeks, Americans in many states appear to have successfully begun to “flatten the…

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Posted in Analysis Public Health The Conversation

1918 flu pandemic killed 12 million Indians, and British overlords’ indifference strengthened the anti-colonial movement

Cremation on the banks of the Ganges river, India. Keystone-France via Getty Images by Maura Chhun, Metropolitan State University April 17, 2020 In India, during the 1918 influenza pandemic, a staggering 12 to 13 million people…

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Posted in Analysis Coronavirus Culture Literature Public Health The Conversation

The Decameron: How the rich reacted to the bubonic plague has eerie similarities to today’s pandemic

Franz Xavier Winterhalter’s ‘The Decameron’ (1837). Heritage Images via Getty Images Kathryn McKinley, University of Maryland, Baltimore County The coronavirus can infect anyone, but recent reporting has shown your socioeconomic status can play a big role,…

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Posted in Analysis Citizen Power Civil Rights Community organizing

Birthed by HBCU students, this organization offers important lessons for today’s student activists

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) founded 60 years ago today.   Jelani Favors, Clayton State University April 15, 2020 marks 60 years since the founding of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, perhaps better known as SNCC,…

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Posted in Coffee Shops Community Coronavirus Restaurants The Conversation

When restaurants close, Americans lose much more than a meal

The Big Texan restaurant, Amarillo, Texas. Carol M. Highsmith, Library of Congress by  Rebecca L. Spang, Indiana University March 20 Arnold Schwarzenegger tweeted a video of himself on March 15 saying: “No more restaurants.” Seated in…

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Posted in Analysis Business Coronavirus The Conversation

Why your local store keeps running out of flour, toilet paper and prescription drugs

by Nada R. Sanders, Northeastern University Retailers are frequently running out of everything from flour and fresh meat to toilet paper and pharmaceuticals as supply chains hammered by the coronavirus struggle to keep up with stockpiling…

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Posted in Analysis Coronavirus Health The Conversation

Beyond sanitizing and social distancing – a healthy circadian rhythm may keep you sane and increase resilience to fight COVID-19

by, Satchin Panda, University of California San Diego Social distancing and washing hands have become the frontline in the fight against COVID-19, but there is another powerfully protective resource immediately available to all: your circadian rhythm….

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